Burton Girls

Burton Girl Talk with NYLON Style Director Dani Stahl

Burton is dedicated to working with likeminded brands that share our passion for collaboration, such as New York City-based fashion and culture magazine,  NYLON

Over the last year we’ve built a great relationship, joining forces on everything from advertising campaigns and launch parties to story features, like NYLON's “Factory Girl” spotlight featuring Burton. The Factory Girl story outlined the process of creating a snowboard in Craig’s Prototype Facility in Burlington, Vermont, and the end result was a unique NYLON x Burton Girls Lip-Stick snowboard, splashed with their signature hot pink.

With such a strong friendship brewing between our two brands, we were excited to turn the tables and get onsite at NYLON to hang with Style Director Dani Stahl. After she gave us a tour of their New York office, we sat down to chat, and following is an interview between Burton’s Chief Marketing Officer Anne-Marie Dacyshyn and Dani. In a meeting room where magazine covers and fashion photos lined the walls, the two marketing mavens discussed careers, style, and the evolution of engaging with women. Read on to see what they said...

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Welcome to Dani's world. So much creative inspiration around every corner of NYLON HQ.

Anne-Marie: Time for reverse Factory Girl! What’s the story of NYLON?

Dani: NYLON has now been around for over 15 years and I’ve been here pretty much since the start. I’ve seen it evolve a lot in that time, but NYLON has always stayed true to its mission. Our reader is very “now.” She’s empowered, stylish, forward thinking, and she’s setting the trends, not following them. In that sense, the NYLON Girl and the Burton Girl are very alike.

Could you walk us through the brief history of Dani Stahl and how you got to where you are today?

I interned here at NYLON while I was attending school at NYU. If you’re someone to really take advantage of the city as part of your learning experience, New York is the place to be. My first job here was being the worst assistant ever, but then they helped me pinpoint what I was good at and what I really wanted to do. I became really involved in marketing when the magazine was just a year old.

Back then, I always wanted to be an Accessories Editor. I started making accessories pages for the magazine and then we would get all the brands to come to events. My trajectory was that I started as an assistant, became “Technology Special Projects Editor,” then I was Accessories Editor and finally, Style Director. Eventually, I had done so many different things at the magazine that I became the go-to person for representing NYLON.

We get asked this a lot at Burton: In a field that’s more male-dominated, how do girls create a career for themselves?

I feel like the career landscape has rapidly changed. People have so much more opportunity to stand out as individuals. If you’re going to succeed in a creative environment, you have to really love it. When the work then matches up to someone who’s passionate about what they’re doing, it just jives. I had interned at a few different magazines, but when I got to NYLON, it all clicked.    

“If you’re going to succeed in a creative environment, you have to really love it.”

You’ve been focused on communicating with women for your whole career here. How has that changed for you over time?

NYLON has always spoken to their audience very intelligently. We’re not telling them how to get their boyfriend back, or how to lose weight after Thanksgiving — we’re smarter than that. We talk to you on a higher level. Now more than ever, women don’t want to be coddled.

We’d love to hear more about your take on women’s fashion, and how the outdoor and active world is blending with streetwear.

People are asserting their individual style and they’re not thinking in the box at all. You don’t even have to advertise an item of clothing for one specific purpose, it just has to be out there. People are wearing gear in such a different way.

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Burton CMO Anne-Marie in the L.A.M.B. x Burton Eno Sweater.
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A look at Dani's desk. Peep that NYLON x Burton Lip-Stick snowboard: The final product of her visit to Burton's Vermont headquarters.
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Our ad on the back of NYLON's December issue. NBD.

Collaboration is an important aspect of Burton. We know you’ve worked with so many brands through Factory Girl. How did that come to life?

For a Paris-themed issue, a couple of my story ideas were about going to two factories: Dior fine jewelry and Longchamp bags. This idea evolved over time and became Factory Girl. In the early days, I would try to explain to people what I was doing and I would have to hunt them down, but eventually it caught its stride. Since it began, I’ve travelled the globe and we’ve covered every type of brand, from high-end luxury like Chanel, to McDonalds (one of my favorite ones, ever). We’ve covered a lot of ground.

Burton had the best recipe for a Factory Girl feature: an interesting location, strong brand culture, and we actually made something. Burton is a company that has a landscape you can really immerse yourself in. We went for two days, step by step, and made this snowboard [the NYLON x Burton Lip-Stick]. After working on the design for at least a couple months in advance, seeing it come to life was the coolest thing.

What are you wearing from Burton these days?

I’m obsessed with all these collaborations, especially L.A.M.B. Even when we were doing this shoot, I was clamoring to wear the Eno Sweater and Irie Beanie. I also love Burton’s cool, basic tees. You have a run of iconic throwback tees that are in my top-ten repertoire. When the laundry comes out, I’m looking for them.

After the interview, we invited Dani over to our neighboring Burton New York Store to do some shopping. Hanging out with her was a blast, and Anne-Marie even convinced her to join us at the Burton US Open later this winter.


The day ended with a NYLON x Burton Girls party at the store with drinks, dancing, and DJ sets. With precipitation coming down and a mash-up of NYLON and Burton crowds, the night, like the partnership, felt like something truly special. Scroll through the photos below for the full experience. ∆

               
  • Our new storefront at 69 Greene Street.

    Our new storefront at 69 Greene Street.

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  • DJ Pebbles amping up the crowd.

    DJ Pebbles amping up the crowd.

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  • The NYLON crew: Editor-in-Chief Melissa Giannini, Fashion Market Editor Marissa Smith, and Dani rocking the L.A.M.B. x Burton Alice Insulator.

    The NYLON crew: Editor-in-Chief Melissa Giannini, Fashion Market Editor Marissa Smith, and Dani rocking the L.A.M.B. x Burton Alice Insulator.

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  • BG Ambassador Skylar Dombroski, live and in print.

    BG Ambassador Skylar Dombroski, live and in print.

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  • Burton family photo featuring artist Jeff Koons and his son, our founder Jake Burton Carpenter, Dani, Anne-Marie, and Skylar.

    Burton family photo featuring artist Jeff Koons and his son, our founder Jake Burton Carpenter, Dani, Anne-Marie, and Skylar.

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  • DJ May Kwok kept it lively later in the night.

    DJ May Kwok kept it lively later in the night.

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  • We were lucky enough to hang with NYLON owner Marc Luzzatto for the night.

    We were lucky enough to hang with NYLON owner Marc Luzzatto for the night.

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  • Another Burton family photo op. From left to right: Anne-Marie, Milk Studio's co-founder Mazdack Rassi, and Skylar.

    Another Burton family photo op. From left to right: Anne-Marie, Milk Studio's co-founder Mazdack Rassi, and Skylar.

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  • We have a winner! Dani and Jake presented one lucky raffle winner with the NYLON x Burton Lip-Stick.

    We have a winner! Dani and Jake presented one lucky raffle winner with the NYLON x Burton Lip-Stick.

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  • Cupcakes, photo booths, and friends. Skylar was psyched on it.

    Cupcakes, photo booths, and friends. Skylar was psyched on it.


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